Huawei's logo seen at a technology conference.
Enlarge / Huawei’s logo at the Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona in November 2019.

Getty Images | SOPA Images

The US House and Senate approved legislation to create a $1 billion fund that will help small telecom providers remove and replace Huawei and ZTE networking equipment.

The bill, which awaits President Trump’s signature, also prohibits telcos from using Federal Communications Commission funding to purchase Huawei or ZTE equipment. But the Congressional action is largely duplicative, as the FCC had already approved a ban.

The Secure and Trusted Communications Networks Act

Mark Zuckerberg speaks.
Enlarge / Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook’s F8 summit in 2018.

Facebook is canceling its massive F8 developers’ conference over fears of COVID-19. The conference had been scheduled to begin on May 5 in San Jose, California.

“F8 is an incredibly important event for Facebook, and it’s one of our favorite ways to celebrate all of you from around the world—but we need to prioritize the health and safety of our developer partners, employees, and everyone who helps put F8 on,” wrote Konstantinos Papamiltiadis, Facebook’s director of developer platforms.

Facebook will attempt to compensate for the closure of the main

Flaw in billions of Wi-Fi devices left communications open to eavesdropping

SAN FRANCISCO — Billions of devices—many of them already patched—are affected by a Wi-Fi vulnerability that allows nearby attackers to decrypt sensitive data sent over the air, researchers said on Wednesday at the RSA security conference.

The vulnerability exists in Wi-Fi chips made by Cypress Semiconductor and Broadcom, the latter whose Wi-Fi business was acquired by Cypress in 2016. The affected devices include iPhones, iPads, Macs, Amazon Echos and Kindles, Android devices, Raspberry Pi 3’s, and Wi-Fi routers from Asus and Huawei. Eset, the security company that discovered the vulnerability, said the flaw primarily affects Cyperess’ and Broadcom’s FullMAC WLAN

The Firefox logo.

Firefox will start switching browser users to Cloudflare’s encrypted-DNS service today and roll out the change across the United States in the coming weeks.

“Today, Firefox began the rollout of encrypted DNS over HTTPS (DoH) by default for US-based users,” Firefox maker Mozilla said in an announcement scheduled to go live at this link Tuesday morning. “The rollout will continue over the next few weeks to confirm no major issues are discovered as this new protocol is enabled for Firefox’s US-based users.”

DNS over HTTPS helps keep eavesdroppers from seeing what DNS lookups your browser is making, potentially making it

This pup will stare at you balefully until someone—or something—feeds it already.
Enlarge / This pup will stare at you balefully until someone—or something—feeds it already.

Automated or otherwise mechanized pet feeders aren’t particularly new; you can find analog models dating back to 1939 at least. But the 21st century being what it is, of course there are now app-driven, cloud-connected “smart” feeders that you control from your phone. And when some mysterious outage takes out that system for a full week, you and your furry friend may end up deeply annoyed.

The Petnet smartfeeder is one such system, and it did indeed recently suffer one such outage, as spotted by TechCrunch.

Promotional image of smartphone app.

In late December, Google and Apple removed the ToTok social messaging app from their marketplaces after US intelligence officials told The New York Times it was a tool for surreptitious spying by the United Arab Emirates government. About a week later, Google reinstated the Android version of the app with no explanation, a move that confounded app users and security experts. Now Google has once again baffled industry watchers by once again banishing the app without saying why. (Apple, meanwhile, has continued to keep the iOS version of ToTok out of the App Store.)

Over the past few days, Play