This pup will stare at you balefully until someone—or something—feeds it already.
Enlarge / This pup will stare at you balefully until someone—or something—feeds it already.

Automated or otherwise mechanized pet feeders aren’t particularly new; you can find analog models dating back to 1939 at least. But the 21st century being what it is, of course there are now app-driven, cloud-connected “smart” feeders that you control from your phone. And when some mysterious outage takes out that system for a full week, you and your furry friend may end up deeply annoyed.

The Petnet smartfeeder is one such system, and it did indeed recently suffer one such outage, as spotted by TechCrunch.

Promotional image of smartphone app.

In late December, Google and Apple removed the ToTok social messaging app from their marketplaces after US intelligence officials told The New York Times it was a tool for surreptitious spying by the United Arab Emirates government. About a week later, Google reinstated the Android version of the app with no explanation, a move that confounded app users and security experts. Now Google has once again baffled industry watchers by once again banishing the app without saying why. (Apple, meanwhile, has continued to keep the iOS version of ToTok out of the App Store.)

Over the past few days, Play

If only it were this easy to catch lost Bitcoin credentials.
Enlarge / If only it were this easy to catch lost Bitcoin credentials.

Cravetiger / Getty Images

In a world where various mass breaches dictate the use of strong, randomized passwords more than ever, reliable and secure credentials management is paramount in 2020. One Irish drug dealer has evidently learned this lesson the hard way.

This week, the Irish Times reported the sad tale of Clifton Collins, a 49-year-old cannabis grower from Dublin. Collins quietly grew and sold his product for 12 years, and he amassed a small fortune by using some of that revenue to buy bitcoins around

California man arrested on charges his DDoSes took down candidate’s website

A California man has been arrested on charges he used distributed denial-of-service attacks to take down the website of a Congressional candidate whose rival employed his wife.

Arthur Jan Dam, 32, of Santa Monica, was arrested by FBI agents on Thursday. According to a criminal complaint filed in Los Angeles federal court, Dam DDoSed the website of a candidate that The Intercept reported was running against Katie Hill in the 2018 primary election. Hill won by fewer than 3,000 votes and went on to flip a Republican-held seat in the general election. Hill later resigned after nude photos of her

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher on November 6, 2018, in Costa Mesa, California, just before he learned he had lost his seat to a Democratic challenger. Rohrabacher, the most Putin-friendly member of Congress, visited with Julian Assange in 2017 to offer him a pardon in exchange for proof that Seth Rich, not Russian intelligence, had leaked the DNC emails.
Enlarge / Rep. Dana Rohrabacher on November 6, 2018, in Costa Mesa, California, just before he learned he had lost his seat to a Democratic challenger. Rohrabacher, the most Putin-friendly member of Congress, visited with Julian Assange in 2017 to offer him a pardon in exchange for proof that Seth Rich, not Russian intelligence, had leaked the DNC emails.

A former California congressman confirmed in an interview with Yahoo News’ Michael Isikoff that he did offer to broker a pardon for Julian Assange in exchange for information that would exonerate Russia from the theft of emails from the Democratic National

A maze of gas pipelines.

A US-based natural gas facility shut down operations for two days after sustaining a ransomware infection that prevented personnel from receiving crucial real-time operational data from control and communication equipment, the Department of Homeland Security said on Tuesday.

Tuesday’s advisory from the DHS’ Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, or CISA, didn’t identify the site except to say that it was a natural gas-compression facility. Such sites typically use turbines, motors, and engines to compress natural gas so it can be safely moved through pipelines.

The attack started with a malicious link in a phishing email that allowed attackers to pivot